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HOMESCHOOLING: Making home an academic stage

February 19, 2013

A homeschooling group met at Peabody Public Library Thursday for their Valentine’s Day party. As part of the activities, children made Valentines as one of their crafts to take to Miller’s Merry Manor to give to the residents. Pictured, from left, are Titus Miller, 6; Olivia Porter, 10; Charity Adair holding her 10-month-old daughter, Rain; Aeris Austin, 11 and McKayla Adair, 8. Post & Mail photo / Melany Love

COLUMBIA CITY ­— More than two million American children are homeschooled.

This number continues to rise as public school funding, education quality and safety cause concern for some parents.

Some families choose to homeschool for religious reasons. Homeschooling lets parents reinforce their personal values and beliefs in a school day environment.

“It doesn’t really take a village to raise a child,” said mother Charity Adair. “It takes parents who are involved.”

Adair said she did not want the government controlling what her children are being taught. “They can’t seem to balance a budget or agree on anything,” Adair said.

Thomas Jefferson, who partially homeschooled himself, was an advocate for education. He even went as far as to ensure his daughters were well educated in a time when women typically weren’t.

A better return

According to the National Home Education Research Institute (NHERI), homeschooled children outperform public school students in many areas.

The average homeschool student scores in the 80th percentile or higher in core subjects. Research shows household income or parental educational backgrounds make no difference in a homeschooled student’s success.

Homeschooled students are more likely to graduate from college, have a higher GPA and be more mature than their public school counterparts, according to NHERI study.

As adults, they are more likely to have a better understanding of government and history.

Seventy-six percent of graduates vote, while only 29 percent of their peers do. NHERI’s study dispells the myth that homeschooled children lack interaction and social skills.

Custom learning

Homeschooling provides an individualized school experience where the parents have more control over what is learned, when it is taught and how material is delivered.

For a more in-depth look at this story, see the Feb. 19 issue of The Post and Mail. Don't have a subscription? Call (260) 244-5153 or subscribe to our e-edition. For breaking news, sports updates and additional coverage, bookmark the homepage and find us on facebook.

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